Joe Budden Unleashes Hell On Drake Diss Track, ‘Making A Murderer (Part One)

Welp! It’s officially a hot summer now that Joe Budden has released his scathing Drake diss record, “Making a Murderer (Part One).” Last week, Joey did a bit of Periscoping and previewed lines from another record including the lyrics, “My words ain’t ghostwritten I ain’t Drake / That’s all gimmick I’m authentic I ain’t Drake / Ain’t nothing wrong with it, only saying I ain’t fake.” But this appears to be totally different. He raps in the first verse:

But now my phone blowin’ up, they’re like what I’m gonna do?
Show the world you shouldn’t poke a man with nothin’ to lose
All of this just because I wasn’t in love with his Views
Whatever happened, I just know they got me fuckin’ confused

“Making a Murderer (Part One)” is a response to a possible, yet-to-be released Drake swipe against the Jersey rapper. Last month, French Montana teased a new song where Papi referenced Budden’s 2003 hit single, “Pump It Up.” The reference was made right after Budden called Drake’s Views an uninspired effort on an episode of I’ll Name This Podcast Later.

Then Drake put out “4 PM In Calabasas” which Joey felt had a couple of subliminals directed his way. He later tweeted and took credit for “inspiring”the Canadian rapper to bring that fire.

Given Budden’s current one-sided feud with Meek, perhaps there’s a “Part Two” coming sooner than later? Either way, Meek has already stated that he will not diss or respond to any records.

Nobody ain’t tryna come at that shermhead/crackhead Joe Buddens. This n*gga got the blogs to say I’m about to diss him [laugh emoji]. We running down on n*ggas off the internet….He’s infatuated with rappers lives. N*gga a podcaster now lol.

Maybe the old “the enemy of my enemy is my friend” thing will come into play here. Probably not.

Rapper Troy Ave pleads not guilty to attempted murder charge stemming from fatal Irving Plaza shooting

Rapper Troy Ave pleaded not guilty Wednesday to an attempted murder charge stemming from a deadly melee at an Irving Plaza concert as his lawyers said they hope to free him by next week.

The 33-year-old Brooklyn-bred performer, whose real name is Roland Collins, was handcuffed to a wheelchair and rolled into Manhattan Supreme Court for his arraignment.

“Not guilty,” the glum looking rapper uttered before the judge, a crowd of supporters and a beefed-up corps of court officers.

Roland Collins (c.), was handcuffed to a wheelchair and rolled into Manhattan Supreme Court for his arraignment.

Roland Collins (c.), was handcuffed to a wheelchair and rolled into Manhattan Supreme Court for his arraignment.

The case was adjourned to July 1 when Collins’ attorneys Scott Leemon and John Stella hope to have him sprung on a bail package.

 

“Don’t forget he is a victim here,” Leemon said outside the courtroom. “He was shot by somebody else. His bodyguard was shot by somebody else.”

“He should be let out on bail and treated like a victim,” the attorney added.

Stella said Collins is recovering slowly from a pair of gunshot wounds — on in each leg — but is in need of physical therapy.

"Not guilty," Roland Collins uttered before the judge.

“Not guilty,” Roland Collins uttered before the judge.

At the brief proceeding, prosecutor Christine Keenan said that that Collins had been hit with additional gun charges stemming from weapons found in his van at the time of his arrest.

Troy Ave, locked up for attempted murder, drops Rikers Island rap

But the May 25 murder of Collins’ bodyguard and childhood pal Ronald McPhatter at a T.I. concert is still “under investigation.”

NYPD officers stand outside Irving Plaza in Manhattan, New York.

NYPD officers stand outside Irving Plaza in Manhattan, New York.

The existing charges “only related to what occurred on the balcony of the Irving Plaza,” Keenan said.

“What happened inside the VIP room is still under investigation,” she added.

Collins is the only person to be charged in connection to the fatal ordeal so far.

He vehemently denies shooting McPhatter and his attorneys have said he wrestled a weapon away from the real aggressor, who has not been identified

Wiz Khalifa Responds – “Says Popcaan Gave Drake Neck” (Red Bull Culture Clash 2016)

 

While Popcaan got annihilated by Wiz Khalifa in their Culture Clash / mini-soundclash, it could actually turn out to be a major win for dancehall reggae. Many have said that dancehall is dying, but if the soundclash culture of dancehall takes off in hip-hop, it could be the shot in the arm that dancehall needed all along.

Imagine if hip-hop fans got turned on to the soundclash culture the way dancehall fans are. It would mean a great deal for not only dancehall but reggae also. Hip-hop DJs would seek dubplates not only from hip-hop artists but also from artists in the reggae dancehall genres. This could introduce dancehall artists to an entire new fan base, the kind of exposure that would allow them to reap tremendous financial benefit.

While the clash between Popcaan and Wiz Khalifa was entertaining, it was embarrassing to see a Jamaican who lives in that type of culture actually lose to an American rapper.

When it was time to play dubs, Popcaan played a drop from Drake instead and then went on to play a Drake record. Wiz Khalifa wasted no time in pointing out that a drop and a dub are two different things. He then referred to Popcaan as pop tart while telling Popcaan that he gave Drake a hand job for the drop. Wiz then showed Popcaan what a real dub is as he easily won the clash with a dub called “Kill them boys.”


All in all, it was a very entertaining segment; embarrassing for Popcaan but great for dancehall reggae.

 

 

POPCAN SUCKS UP DRAKE

Happy fathers day from Jessenia vice

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FOR BOOKINGS CONTACT: iAmJesseniaVice@gmail.com

JESSENIA VICE BIO

“Queen of the ‘Kim Kardashian’s” as seen on Tyra Bank Show

“Miss Apple Bottom 2011” annonced by Nelly and Apple Bottom Co.

Jessenia Vice was born and raised in New Jersey. She grew up across one of the most dangerous projects in Newark, called Pennington Courts. Refusing to become a product of her outside environment she went on to excel academically throughout High School and College.

Miss Vice was discovered off Myspace, her look and lifestyle turned the heads of thousands of people. She was only 17! She was first approached by Charles Gardner (Rosa Acosta’s manger ) who felt she had the look to be the next big thing! However, Jessenia felt she was too young and also doubted herself. After years of being told she should model , she finally stepped into the industry early Summer of 2009 which introduced her to the world on the Tyra Bank Show. However, no one knew who that girl on the show was.

Jessenia felt that her 5 minutes of fame came and went with little to show. Discouraged by the stigma of being a sex symbol and aware of the plateau she’s seen many big time vixens fall into she deleted her Myspace and planned to leave the industry. Before she could go any further and delete her other social networks, her abuela and she had a heart to heart. It was there that her grandmother made her promise to enjoy her time and not to never give up. The promise was made. In a few weeks Jessenia returned to see her grandmother only to find her terribly ill and who’s life late ended August 2010.

A month later Jessenia received a phone call that would change her world. She was asked to shoot for O.Y.E Magazine with the potential of a cover, no promises. Jessenia flew out and later found out she landed the cover of issue #49! She dedicated her first cover to her grandmother. Since then, Jessenia has been on national television (MTV & MUN2), numerous U.S & international printed magazines (3 covers), leads in major music videos, and hosts her own radio show and has worked in an independent film.

The “Vice” movement has snowballed into what it is today! Her brand can be recognized from coast to coast and over seas thanks to her impressive resume and her presences in the world wide web. Jessenia has been able to do this under no management other than her own. Jessenia has been able to do so much is so little time,all the while working a full time job at the Psychiatric ER! She proves that beauty and brains can go hand in hand , and proves to be a positive role model for any aspiring talent. So , what’s next for Jessenia? Skies proven to have no limits.

Jessenia is now the new face of Nelly’s Apple Bottom Clothing, scheduled to shoot in September 2011 for their world wide 2012 campaign and is proud to be the first Latina in his marketing project. Jessenia has grown since her debut on the Tyra Show as Kim’s look alike and is recognized as respectable public figure amongst her peers and fans. Her look is so diverse it compliments urban, latino and mainstream audiences.

Jessenia continues to branch out and is pursuing the footsteps of her fellow O.Y.E covergirls, such as Eva Longoria and Sofia Vergara who where once glamour models and are now a household name. Jessenia is registering to take acting courses and scheduled to attended NY & LA castings. She is scheduled to shoot for printed magazines and is working on her first signal with a group of talented and enthusiastic group of people ready to surprise the world and show what Miss Vice has to offer. There will also be a 2week tour to her home country Ecuador for a media tour (t.v, radio, newspaper & more). Her motivation: her family who are currently undergo hardships do to the economy.

Keep your eyes and ears open as Jessenia is working on your recent project: MUSIC!!!

RESUME :

TYRA BANKS SHOW – 2009
BACHLOR MAGAZINE – Cover Girl 2009
STRAIGHT STUNTIN MAGAZINE – 2009
GIRLS OF LOWRIDER – 2009 & 2010
O.Y.E MAGAZINE – Cover Girl 2010
SHOCK MAGAZINE – Cover Girl 2010
MAXIM U.S.A – Top 100 Hotties 2010
KING-MAG.COM – Girl of the Week 2010
ASKMEN.COM – 16 pic gallary 2010
BLACKMEN MAGAZINE – 2011
KING MAGAZINE – The Women of King 2011
MAXIM ESPANOL – Cover 2011
VIBE.COM – Spring 2011
THESOURCE.COM – New Face 2011
XXLMAG.COM – Eye Candy 2011
MTV SILENT LIBRARY – Season 4 2011
VICE CITY – Radio Personality & Host 2011
MUN2 RMP MIAMI RECAP- 2011
MUN2 Promo Photo & Video shoot – 2011
MISS APPLE BOTTOMS USA – 2011
APPLE BOTTOMS FALL CAMPAIGN SPOKES MODEL – 2011
DJ JAY’S NYC AD CAMPAIGN – 2011

CHAD B Ft JESSENIA VICE “Runway” – 2011
PHAR CITY Ft RANGE (Roc Nation)– Lead 2010 “Part Time Lover”
Juelz Santana Ft Chris Brown – “Back To The Crib 2010″
FAT JOE Ft TREY SONGZ – Lead 2010 “If It Aint About the Money”
50 CENT Ft TONY YAYO – Lead 2010 “Pass the Patron”
ELIZABETH WITHERS – Lead 2010 “No Regrets”
DJ MAD Ft FATMAN SCOOP ft MAGIC JUAN “Put Your Drinks Up 2010”
C-PO “Hold It Down” – 2010
TRILLOGY “Ride Around Town” 2010

KAPPA CAMPAIGN w DR JAYS – 2012
MTV COMPUTER LOVE – 2012
ECUAVISA TV Interview – 2012 Major Latin America TV Network
MUN2 “18 & Over Interview” – 2012
VladTV – 2012 Movie Review & Health Advisor
LatinMixx Awards – 2012 Presenter

SPIKE TV- Tattoo Nightmare – Acting Role “Silvia” – 2013
Music Debut “In Love With The DJ” – 2013
SHOW Magazine – 9 page feature – 2013
LatinMixx Awards – Hosted Show along side Alex Sensation from LaMega FM NYC – 2013
Vertissatude – 10 page feature – 2013

BISHOPDEVILLE.COM -2016

CURRENTLY WORKING ON ALBUM W WARNER CHAPEL PRODUCERS AND WRITERS
CURRENTLY WORKING WITH SONY PRODCUERS AND WRITERS
CURRENTLY HAVE A BOOTLINE SCHEDULED TO DROP IN THE FALL

Happy fathers day from Jessenia vice & BISHOPDEVILLE.COM

 

CHECK ME OUT AT  JESSENIA FULL WEBSITE

 

 

tumblr_mucq4n6C9G1rnchuwo1_1280Jessenia-Vice-13jessenia-vice-87674jessenia-vice-87677jessenia-vice-87678jessenia-vice-87685jessenia-vice-87680jessenia-vice-87686jessenia-vice-87683132487_494814086440_326834186440_6373045_3969347_o1mg_4772webmg_4751wmg_4784wmg_4783w

FOR BOOKINGS CONTACT: iAmJesseniaVice@gmail.com

JESSENIA VICE BIO

“Queen of the ‘Kim Kardashian’s” as seen on Tyra Bank Show

“Miss Apple Bottom 2011” annonced by Nelly and Apple Bottom Co.

Jessenia Vice was born and raised in New Jersey. She grew up across one of the most dangerous projects in Newark, called Pennington Courts. Refusing to become a product of her outside environment she went on to excel academically throughout High School and College.

Miss Vice was discovered off Myspace, her look and lifestyle turned the heads of thousands of people. She was only 17! She was first approached by Charles Gardner (Rosa Acosta’s manger ) who felt she had the look to be the next big thing! However, Jessenia felt she was too young and also doubted herself. After years of being told she should model , she finally stepped into the industry early Summer of 2009 which introduced her to the world on the Tyra Bank Show. However, no one knew who that girl on the show was.

Jessenia felt that her 5 minutes of fame came and went with little to show. Discouraged by the stigma of being a sex symbol and aware of the plateau she’s seen many big time vixens fall into she deleted her Myspace and planned to leave the industry. Before she could go any further and delete her other social networks, her abuela and she had a heart to heart. It was there that her grandmother made her promise to enjoy her time and not to never give up. The promise was made. In a few weeks Jessenia returned to see her grandmother only to find her terribly ill and who’s life late ended August 2010.

A month later Jessenia received a phone call that would change her world. She was asked to shoot for O.Y.E Magazine with the potential of a cover, no promises. Jessenia flew out and later found out she landed the cover of issue #49! She dedicated her first cover to her grandmother. Since then, Jessenia has been on national television (MTV & MUN2), numerous U.S & international printed magazines (3 covers), leads in major music videos, and hosts her own radio show and has worked in an independent film.

The “Vice” movement has snowballed into what it is today! Her brand can be recognized from coast to coast and over seas thanks to her impressive resume and her presences in the world wide web. Jessenia has been able to do this under no management other than her own. Jessenia has been able to do so much is so little time,all the while working a full time job at the Psychiatric ER! She proves that beauty and brains can go hand in hand , and proves to be a positive role model for any aspiring talent. So , what’s next for Jessenia? Skies proven to have no limits.

Jessenia is now the new face of Nelly’s Apple Bottom Clothing, scheduled to shoot in September 2011 for their world wide 2012 campaign and is proud to be the first Latina in his marketing project. Jessenia has grown since her debut on the Tyra Show as Kim’s look alike and is recognized as respectable public figure amongst her peers and fans. Her look is so diverse it compliments urban, latino and mainstream audiences.

Jessenia continues to branch out and is pursuing the footsteps of her fellow O.Y.E covergirls, such as Eva Longoria and Sofia Vergara who where once glamour models and are now a household name. Jessenia is registering to take acting courses and scheduled to attended NY & LA castings. She is scheduled to shoot for printed magazines and is working on her first signal with a group of talented and enthusiastic group of people ready to surprise the world and show what Miss Vice has to offer. There will also be a 2week tour to her home country Ecuador for a media tour (t.v, radio, newspaper & more). Her motivation: her family who are currently undergo hardships do to the economy.

Keep your eyes and ears open as Jessenia is working on your recent project: MUSIC!!!

RESUME :

TYRA BANKS SHOW – 2009
BACHLOR MAGAZINE – Cover Girl 2009
STRAIGHT STUNTIN MAGAZINE – 2009
GIRLS OF LOWRIDER – 2009 & 2010
O.Y.E MAGAZINE – Cover Girl 2010
SHOCK MAGAZINE – Cover Girl 2010
MAXIM U.S.A – Top 100 Hotties 2010
KING-MAG.COM – Girl of the Week 2010
ASKMEN.COM – 16 pic gallary 2010
BLACKMEN MAGAZINE – 2011
KING MAGAZINE – The Women of King 2011
MAXIM ESPANOL – Cover 2011
VIBE.COM – Spring 2011
THESOURCE.COM – New Face 2011
XXLMAG.COM – Eye Candy 2011
MTV SILENT LIBRARY – Season 4 2011
VICE CITY – Radio Personality & Host 2011
MUN2 RMP MIAMI RECAP- 2011
MUN2 Promo Photo & Video shoot – 2011
MISS APPLE BOTTOMS USA – 2011
APPLE BOTTOMS FALL CAMPAIGN SPOKES MODEL – 2011
DJ JAY’S NYC AD CAMPAIGN – 2011

CHAD B Ft JESSENIA VICE “Runway” – 2011
PHAR CITY Ft RANGE (Roc Nation)– Lead 2010 “Part Time Lover”
Juelz Santana Ft Chris Brown – “Back To The Crib 2010″
FAT JOE Ft TREY SONGZ – Lead 2010 “If It Aint About the Money”
50 CENT Ft TONY YAYO – Lead 2010 “Pass the Patron”
ELIZABETH WITHERS – Lead 2010 “No Regrets”
DJ MAD Ft FATMAN SCOOP ft MAGIC JUAN “Put Your Drinks Up 2010”
C-PO “Hold It Down” – 2010
TRILLOGY “Ride Around Town” 2010

KAPPA CAMPAIGN w DR JAYS – 2012
MTV COMPUTER LOVE – 2012
ECUAVISA TV Interview – 2012 Major Latin America TV Network
MUN2 “18 & Over Interview” – 2012
VladTV – 2012 Movie Review & Health Advisor
LatinMixx Awards – 2012 Presenter

SPIKE TV- Tattoo Nightmare – Acting Role “Silvia” – 2013
Music Debut “In Love With The DJ” – 2013
SHOW Magazine – 9 page feature – 2013
LatinMixx Awards – Hosted Show along side Alex Sensation from LaMega FM NYC – 2013
Vertissatude – 10 page feature – 2013

BISHOPDEVILLE.COM -2016

CURRENTLY WORKING ON ALBUM W WARNER CHAPEL PRODUCERS AND WRITERS
CURRENTLY WORKING WITH SONY PRODCUERS AND WRITERS
CURRENTLY HAVE A BOOTLINE SCHEDULED TO DROP IN THE FALL

Attrel “Prince Be” Cordes, founding member of the chart-topping hip-hop duo P.M. Dawn, died Friday

prince be
Attrel “Prince Be” Cordes, one-half of the chart-topping hip-hop duo P.M. Dawn, died Friday following a battle with renal kidney disease. Steve Eichner/Archive Photos

Attrel “Prince Be” Cordes, founding member of the chart-topping hip-hop duo P.M. Dawn, died Friday in a New Jersey hospital following a battle with renal kidney disease. He was 46. A representative for the group confirmed Cordes’ death to People.

“Prince Be Rest In Peace forever more, Pain from Diabetes can’t harm you anymore,” Cordes’ cousin and P.M. Dawn member Doc G wrote onthe group’s Facebook page following Cordes’ death. “My Heart is at Peace B-Cuz U suffered so long, Tell Grandma I said Hi & Stay Blisstatic & Strong.”

Formed by brothers Attrel and Jarrett “DJ Minutemix” Cordes in their native Jersey City, New Jersey in 1988, P.M. Dawn became only the third hip-hop act ever – and first black rappers – to top the Billboard Hot 100 in 1991 with their single “Set Adrift on Memory Bliss,” which revolved around a sample of Spandau Ballet’s “True.” The band’s critically acclaimed 1991 debut LP, Of the Heart, of the Soul and of the Cross: The Utopian Experience, achieved gold status, as did its well-received follow-up, 1993’s The Bliss Album…?<?i>.

P.M. Dawn once again climbed to the upper reaches of the Hot 100 again – Number Three – with their ballad “I’d Die Without You,” which gained popularity after first appearing on the 1992 soundtrack for the Eddie Murphy film Boomerang. The track later featured on The Bliss Album…?alongside “Looking Through Patient Eyes,” another Top 10 hit and a cover of the Beatles’ “Norwegian Wood (The Bird Has Flown).”

The Cordes brothers released two more albums in the Nineties, 1995’s Jesus Wept and 1998’s Dearest Christian, I’m So Very Sorry for Bringing You Here. Love, Dad, neither of which attained the critical or commercial success of its predecessors. Although health problems stemming from diabetes took its toll on Prince Be – he suffered a stroke in 2005 that paralyzed the left side of his body, and his one of his legs was amputated below the kneecap – but P.M. Dawn continued to have a considerable impact on contemporary hip-hop, including its “cloud rap” offshoot.

“Kanye West, T-Pain, Outkast… but you can’t mention P.M. Dawn without mentioning De La Soul, and you can’t mention Arrested Development without mentioning P.M. Dawn,” Doc G said in a 2011 interview of the artists P.M. Dawn inspired. “Everybody begets somebody. We had the weirdness. Now it’s okay to be weird; it’s okay to wear bizarre things.”

 

CONFIRMED Kimbo Slice, born Kevin Ferguson, has passed away. He was 42-years-old.

 

Kimbo Slice, born Kevin Ferguson, has passed away. He was 42-years-old.

The famed MMA fighter Kimbo Slice was admitted to a hospital in a “dire” condition earlier today (June 6) in Florida.

Reports TMZ:

MMA fighter Kimbo Slice was hospitalized in Florida earlier today … and multiple sources tell TMZ Sports the situation does not look good. 

Law enforcement sources tell us … Slice was admitted to a hospital near his home in Coral Springs, FL. 

Police are currently at his home gathering information from family members. 

Kimbo — real name Kevin Ferguson — last fought at Bellator 149 back in February and defeated Dada 5000 — but the victory was overturned when Slice tested positive for a banned steroid.

Unconfirmed sources are saying Kimbo was rushed to the hospital after suffering a heart attack.

Kimbo’s training partner, Tyler Cook, has reportedly confirmed the street fighter turned MMA pro’s death.

This story is developing.

 

 

Muhammad Ali, the silver-tongued boxer and civil rights champion who famously proclaimed himself “The Greatest” and then spent a lifetime living up to the billing, is dead.

Ali died Friday at a Phoenix-area hospital, where he had spent the past few days being treated for respiratory complications, a family spokesperson confirmed to NBC News. He was 74.Muhammad Ali r.i.p

Ali had suffered for three decades from Parkinson’s Disease, a progressive neurological condition that slowly robbed him of both his legendary verbal grace and his physical dexterity. A funeral service is planned in his hometown of Louisville, Kentucky.

Even as his health declined, Ali did not shy from politics or controversy, releasing a statement in December criticizing Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s proposal to ban Muslims from entering the United States. “We as Muslims have to stand up to those who use Islam to advance their own personal agenda,” he said.

The remark bookended the life of a man who burst into the national consciousness in the early 1960s, when as a young heavyweight champion he converted to Islam and refused to serve in the Vietnam War, and became an emblem of strength, eloquence, conscience and courage. Ali was an anti-establishment showman who transcended borders and barriers, race and religion. His fights against other men became spectacles, but he embodied much greater battles.

Muhammad Ali Celebrated at Compelling, Affectionate New Exhibition 1:06

Born Cassius Clay on Jan. 17, 1942 in Louisville, Kentucky, to middle-class parents, Ali started boxing when he was 12, winning Golden Gloves titles before heading to the 1960 Olympics in Rome, where he won a gold medal as a light heavyweight.

He turned professional shortly afterward, supported at first by Louisville business owners who guaranteed him an unprecedented 50-50 split in earnings. His knack for talking up his own talents — often in verse — earned him the dismissive nickname “the Louisville Lip,” but he backed up his talk with action, relocating to Miami to train with the legendary trainer Angelo Dundee and build a case for getting a shot at the heavyweight title.

Image: Muhammad Ali
Muhammad Ali, right, attacks Alex Mitoff in the sixth round in which Ali clobbered the Argentinean to the canvas, on Oct. 7, 1961 in Louisville, Ky. H.B. Littell / AP, file

As his profile rose, Ali acted out against American racism. After he was refused services at a soda fountain counter, he said, he threw his Olympic gold medal into a river.

Recoiling from the sport’s tightly knit community of agents and promoters, Ali found guidance instead from the Nation of Islam, an American Muslim sect that advocated racial separation and rejected the pacifism of most civil rights activism. Inspired by Malcolm X, one of the group’s leaders, he converted in 1963. But he kept his new faith a secret until the crown was safely in hand.

Related: ‘Blood Brothers’: The Fatal Friendship Between Muhammad Ali and Malcolm X

That came the following year, when heavyweight champion Sonny Liston agreed to fight Ali. The challenger geared up for the bout with a litany of insults and rhymes, including the line, “float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.” He beat the fearsome Liston in a sixth-round technical knockout before a stunned Miami Beach crowd. In the ring, Ali proclaimed, “I am the greatest! I am the greatest! I’m the king of the world.”

A Controversial Champion

The new champion soon renounced Cassius Clay as his “slave name” and said he would be known from then on as Muhammad Ali — bestowed by Nation of Islam founder Elijah Muhammad. He was 22 years old.

The move split sports fans and the broader American public: an American sports champion rejecting his birth name and adopting one that sounded subversive.

Image: Muhammad Ali
Speaking at a press conference in Chicago on Sept. 25, 1970, deposed world heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali “Cassius Clay” said he might fight Jerry Quarry in New York if Georgia Gov. Lester Maddox succeeds in halting the scheduled Atlanta bout. Charles Kolenovsky / AP, file

Ali successfully defended his title six times, including a rematch with Liston. Then, in 1967, at the height of the Vietnam War, Ali was drafted to serve in the U.S. Army.

He’d said previously that the war did not comport with his faith, and that he had “no quarrel” with America’s enemy, the Vietcong. He refused to serve.

“My conscience won’t let me go shoot my brother, or some darker people, some poor, hungry people in the mud, for big powerful America, and shoot them for what?” Ali said in an interview. “They never called me nigger. They never lynched me. They didn’t put no dogs on me.”

His stand culminated with an April appearance at an Army recruiting station, where he refused to step forward when his name was called. The reaction was swift and harsh. He was stripped of his boxing title, convicted of draft evasion and sentenced to five years in prison.

Released on appeal but unable to fight or leave the country, Ali turned to the lecture circuit, speaking on college campuses, where he engaged in heated debates, pointing out the hypocrisy of denying rights to blacks even as they were ordered to fight the country’s battles abroad.

“My enemy is the white people, not Vietcongs or Chinese or Japanese,” Ali told one white student who challenged his draft avoidance. “You my opposer when I want freedom. You my opposer when I want justice. You my opposer when I want equality. You won’t even stand up for me in America for my religious beliefs and you want me to go somewhere and fight but you won’t even stand up for me here at home.”

Muhammad Ali; Sony Liston
Muhammad Ali is held back by referee Joe Walcott, left, after Ali knocked out challenger Sonny Liston in the first round of their title fight in Lewiston, Maine on May 25, 1965. AP, file

Ali’s fiery commentary was praised by antiwar activists and black nationalists and vilified by conservatives, including many other athletes and sportswriters.

His appeal took four years to reach the U.S. Supreme Court, which in June 1971 reversed the conviction in a unanimous decision that found the Department of Justice had improperly told the draft board that Ali’s stance wasn’t motivated by religious belief.

Return to the Ring

Toward the end of his legal saga, Georgia agreed to issue Ali a boxing license, which allowed him to fight Jerry Quarry, whom he beat. Six months later, at a sold-out Madison Square Garden, he lost to Joe Frazier in a 15-round duel touted as “the fight of the century.” It was Ali’s first defeat as a pro.

That fight began one of boxing’s and sport’s greatest rivalries. Ali and Frazier fought again in 1974, after Frazier had lost his crown. This time, Ali won in a unanimous decision, making him the lead challenger for the heavyweight title.

He took it from George Foreman later that year in a fight in Zaire dubbed “The Rumble in the Jungle,” a spectacularly hyped bout for which Ali moved to Africa for the summer, followed by crowds of chanting locals wherever he went. A three-day music festival featuring James Brown and B.B. King preceded the fight. Finally, Ali delivered a historic performance in the ring, employing a new strategy dubbed the “rope-a-dope,” goading the favored Foreman into attacking him, then leaning back into the ropes in a defensive stance and waiting for Foreman to tire. Ali then went on the attack, knocking out Foreman in the eighth round. The maneuver has been copied by many other champions since.

The third fight in the Ali-Frazier trilogy followed in 1975, the “Thrilla in Manila” that is now regarded as one of the best boxing matches of all time. Ali won in a technical knockout in the 15th round.

Ali successfully defended his title until 1978, when he was beaten by a young Leon Spinks, and then quickly took it back. He retired in 1979, when he was 37, but, seeking to replenish his dwindling personal fortune, returned in 1980 for a title match against Larry Holmes, which he lost. Ali lost again, to Trevor Berbick, the following year. Finally, Ali retired for good.

Image: Muhammad Ali Trevor Berbick
Muhammad Ali, right, takes a punch from Trevor Berbick, of Canada, during the first round of their 10-round bout in Nassau, Bahamas, in this Dec. 11, 1981 file photo. AP, file

‘He’s Human, Like Us’

The following year, Ali was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease.

“I’m in no pain,” he told The New York Times. “A slight slurring of my speech, a little tremor. Nothing critical. If I was in perfect health — if I had won my last two fights — if I had no problem, people would be afraid of me. Now they feel sorry for me. They thought I was Superman. Now they can go, ‘He’s human, like us. He has problems.’ ”

Even as his health gradually declined, Ali — who switched to more mainstream branches of Islam — threw himself into humanitarian causes, traveling to Lebanon in 1985 and Iraq in 1990 to seek the release of American hostages. In 1996, he lit the Olympic flame in Atlanta, lifting the torch with shaking arms. With each public appearance he seemed more feeble, a stark contrast to his outsized aura. He continued to be one of the most recognizable people in the world.

Image: Muhammad Ali Sports For Peace - Fundraising Ball - Inside
Muhammad Ali attends the Sports For Peace Fundraising Ball at The V&amp;A on July 25, 2012 in London. Ian Gavan / Getty Images, file

He traveled incessantly for many years, crisscrossing the globe in appearances in which he made money but also pushed philanthropic causes. He met with presidents, royalty, heads of state, the Pope. He told “People” magazine that his largest regret was not playing a more intimate role in the raising of his children. But he said he did not regret boxing. “If I wasn’t a boxer, I wouldn’t be famous,” he said. “If I wasn’t famous, I wouldn’t be able to do what I’m doing now.”

In 2005, President George W. Bush honored Ali with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and his hometown of Louisville opened the Muhammad Ali Center, chronicling his life but also as a forum for promoting tolerance and respect.

Divorced three times and the father of nine children — one of whom, Laila, become a boxer — Ali married his last wife, Yolanda “Lonnie” Williams, in 1986; they lived for a long time in Berrien Springs, Michigan, then moved to Arizona.

In recent years, Ali’s health began to suffer dramatically. There was a death scare in 2013, and last year he was rushed to the hospital after being found unresponsive. He recovered and returned to his new home in Arizona.

In his final years, Ali was barely able to speak. Asked to share his personal philosophy with NPR in 2009, Ali let his wife read his essay:

“I never thought of the possibility of failing, only of the fame and glory I was going to get when I won,” Ali wrote. “I could see it. I could almost feel it. When I proclaimed that I was the greatest of all time, I believed in myself, and I still do.”

Music legend Prince was killed by an overdose of the powerful painkiller fentanyl

Fentanyl killed the princeMusic legend Prince was killed by an overdose of the powerful painkiller fentanyl, Minnesota health officials said Thursday.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid up to 100 times more potent than morphine that is used for severe pain such as advanced cancer, according the Centers for Disease Control. Although it can be obtained by prescription, many overdoses are linked to illegally made versions of the drug, officials say.

The Drug Enforcement Administration says it’s more dangerous than heroin and taking too much can cause respiratory depression. Some 700 deaths between late 2013 and early 2015 were tied to fentanyl and its variations.

It’s not clear if Prince got fentanyl from a doctor or another source or how long he was taking it. His death is the subject of a multiagency probe that includes the DEA and federal prosecutors.

“The investigation into Prince’s death remains active,” said Jason Kamerud, chief deputy of Carver County Sheriff’s Department. “I can not say when it will be completed.”

The 57-year-old singer was found April 21 in an elevator of his Paisley Park Studios in Chanhassen, Minnesota, when an employee of a drug rehab in California arrived to see him.

A Prince representative had contacted the rehab, Recovery Without Walls, the day before about a “grave medical emergency” related to the use of prescription pain medication, the facility’s attorney later told reporters.

The rehab doctor, Howard Kornfeld, dispatched his son, who is not a physician, to Minnesota with the goal of evaluating Prince and getting him to enter treatment, the lawyer said.

The son was carrying with him a drug that is often used for opioid withdrawal, but when he got to Paisley Park, he and staff members found Prince unresponsive. An ambulance rushed him to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Six days earlier, Prince was briefly hospitalized in Illinois after his plane made an unscheduled stop. His representatives said he was suffering from the flu, though audio from air traffic controllers later revealed the pilot reported an “unresponsive passenger.”

Image: (FILE) Prince Reportedly Dies At 57 36th Annual NAACP Image Awards – Show
Prince performs onstage at the 36th Annual NAACP Image Awards at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on March 19, 2005 in Los Angeles, Calif. Kevin Winter / Getty Images, file
At the time of his death, Prince was being treated by Minneapolis geriatrician Michael Schulenberg for opioid withdrawal, anemia and a fatigue, a source with knowledge of his treatment told NBC News.

According to court documents, Schulenberg had seen Prince the night of April 20 and went to Paisley Park the following morning to deliver test results only to discover his patient had died. He told police he had prescribed medication to Prince; the source said the medication was not painkillers.

After his death, close friends of Prince said they did not believe the musician — a devout Jehovah’s Witness and proponent of clean leaving — was abusing drugs.

Others have pointed out that Prince had hip problems from years of energetic performances that could have pushed him to take pain medicine.

“When you get into the last years of your ability to meet the public’s demands, you’ve to take something to either enhance your performance, recover from your performance, or to address the pain later,” said a former band member who performed with him a year ago.

“You just can’t perform on that level and meet those audience demands without taking something, legal or illegal.”

A law firm representing Prince’s only full sibling, Tyka Nelson, said they had no comment on the medical examiner’s report.

Dr. Mark Willenbring, who heads the Alltyr clinic in Minneapolis, said he’s seen fentanyl abuse in his clients.

“It’s very much happening here,” he said. “People are getting all sorts of stuff, including fentanyl, off the dark web.”

Willenbring said fentanyl addiction is treated the same way as addiction to other pain medications like Percocet or Oxycontin.

He believes that if Prince or his handlers had sought help at a local clinic and been treated with a drug like Suboxone — similar to the drug the rehab doctor’s son brought with him — he would likely still be alive.

He wondered if fear of being exposed had stopped the singer or his associates from reaching out to an addiction specialist sooner.

“Because Prince was Prince he didn’t get good care,” Willenbring said. “It’s a terrible tragedy.”

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