inside chapos ecape tunnel

Infamous drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, who daringly escaped prison on July 11, utilized a tunnel leading from the only “supermax” maximum-security prison in Mexico, where he’d been held. At least that’s the explanation Mexican authorities have given as to how the leader of the Sinaloa cartel escaped prison for the second time.

In the aftermath of the escape, VICE News went to Almoloya de Juarez to inspect the exit of the tunnel that “El Chapo” allegedly used, and spoke with an activist and former inmate of Altiplano prison who claims to have discovered flaws in the authorities’ version of events.

In Photos: Take a Tour of the Tunnel ‘Chapo’ Guzman Used to Escape in Mexico – http://bit.ly/1CTEMdK

Mexico Releases Footage of ‘Chapo’ Escape, But Will Public Believe It? – http://bit.ly/1SF2tIP

‘Chapo’ Prison Break Shows Just How Weak Mexico’s Government Really Is – http://bit.ly/1HVTkXf

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Supporters of south park mexican a jailed rapper march in hopes of retrial


  • Promotional materials for a protest in support of Carlos Coy -- also known as South Park Mexican -- made the round this week.
    Promotional materials for a protest in support of Carlos Coy — also known as South Park Mexican — made the round this week.

A large group of people marched near downtown Houston Friday afternoon in support of a jailed hip-hop artist they say was wrongfully convicted of aggravated sexual assault in May 2002.

Carlos Coy was sentenced to 45 years in prison for the assault of a 9-year-old girl who was staying at his home during a children’s sleepover.

Coy is known as South Park Mexican in Houston’s Latin hip-hop scene. He was a popular act in the late ’90s and early ’00s until the conviction and incarceration. In the past decade supporters have remained united behind him.

According to the Houston Press, this week representatives from the rapper’s local label, Dope House Records, intended to march to the Harris County district attorney’s office  for a peaceful protest of the 12-year-old conviction. They say that Coy was convicted based on hearsay,without physical evidence. They would like to see his case retried. After the protest the group planned to return to the label’s location on Center Street for a mixer.

According to the Houston Press, Coy may not get a chance for parole until he’s at least 52 years old. Coy turns 44 on Sunday.

A Houston Press feature in the summer of 2002 told the tale of Coy, once the pride of Houston’s burgeoning hip-hop turned convicted child molester. His story of small-time street thug turned inspiration to Hispanic youth touched many, making the child molestation conviction more shocking to his supporters.

His label has managed to release new music under his name since his 2002 conviction, including the recent “Son of Norma” LP released on Sept. 30.

Rapper Too Short was carrying loaded gun at airport.

Police: Rapper Too Short was carrying loaded gun at airport

Rapper Too Short performs during the 29th annual Adult Video News Awards Show at The Joint inside the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino on Jan. 21, 2012, in Las Vegas. Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Rapper Too Short has been cited at a Southern California airport a day after fleeing a security checkpoint when a screener found a loaded handgun in his carry-on luggage.

Burbank police Sgt. John Pfrommer says the rapper, born Todd Anthony Shaw, was passing through the checkpoint at Bob Hope Airport on Wednesday when a Transportation Security Administration employee noticed the handgun going through a baggage scanner.

The rapper fled the building via an exit door, leaving his belongings behind, the Burbank Leader reported.

Pfrommer says Too Short returned to the airport Thursday with his attorney and was cited on misdemeanor possession of a loaded handgun in a public place.

He was released and is due in court Nov. 3. Police didn’t know who the rapper’s attorney is.

Too Short rose to prominence in the late 1980s out of Oakland. His hits include “Life Is … Too Short” and “Blow the Whistle.”

Last year, he was arrested in Hollywood on suspicion of drunk driving and drug possession, according to the Los Angeles Times. In 2009, he was arrested twice on suspicion of driving under the influence and was charged with misdemeanor battery during a performance at an Idaho nightclub a year later.

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Rapper Common’s Father, Lonnie Lynn, Dies at 71

Lonnie Lynn, known to hip-hop fans for his soulful spoken-word poems on rapper son Common’s albums, has died.

Lynn died at age 71 on Friday, Common said in an interview Monday in Los Angeles. He gave no further details.

Lynn was a star high school basketball player in Chicago and played in the 1969-1970 season in the American Basketball Association. He struggled with drug addiction and with being a father to six children, topics he addressed in poignant, sometimes regretful poems that concluded many of Common’s albums.

“He was truly a natural poet and master of words. His personality and soul shined through his work,” Common, whose real name is Lonnie Rashid Lynn Jr., said in the interview Monday.

“The way he said things made me look at life and the world in a new way, in a different way. They always sparked a thought in my head. His words would always make me strive to achieve higher, to write better, to be more truthful with my words.”

Common is also an actor, appearing in films including “Terminator: Salvation” and “LUV” and as a regular on the AMC series “Hell on Wheels.”

Lynn, known as “Pops” on Common’s albums, recorded his last poem for the rapper’s 2011 release, “The Dreamer/The Believer.”

“For those of us who come from less than enviable circumstances, dreams — good dreams, sweet dreams — dreams come true. Truthful dreams, truthful dreams become life,” he intoned in the song, called “Pops Belief.”

“Live the life you believe. The American dream, the black American dream, the universal dream. For the sake of the unwritten laws of humanity, I believe in God. I believe in my ancestors, I believe in my offsprings … I believe in the truth, truth. See you next lifetime.”

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