Proof the “illumiyachty” is real.

 

WELL FOLKS IT OFFICIAL .IVE FOLLOWED THE BUZZ RIDDEN CAREER OF LIL TWATTY (NOT A TYPO PUN INTENDED).ALTHOUGH I HAVE MY PERSONAL DISCOURSE WITH THE STATE OF MODERN DAY MUSIC AT THE HANDS OF THIS MEDIA SENSATION AS I WILL NOT CHANGE MY OVERALL LYRICAL RATING OF THE YOUNG LAD AS AN A+ IN WHACKNESS.HE IS HOW EVER WORKING HIS WAY INTO THE VEINS OF THE MAINSTREAM MARKETING WORLD.LETS FACE IT THIS IS WHAT OUR CHILDREN VIEW AS COOL AND IF YOU Have a son the is between the ages of 11-18 your child may be gay as a result of the main stream agenda.not conspiracy theory rather cuntspiracy theory as the Illuminati brings us lil yachty. and coined here the term “illumiyachty” .

Q, the founder WorldstarHipHop.com, one of the most popular Hip-Hop sites in the world died

 

 

Q, the founder WorldstarHipHop.com, one of the most popular Hip-Hop sites in the world died today (January 24).

Q, born Lee O’Denat, died in his sleep at the age of 43, according to multiple reports.

“My condolences go out to his family. Q was an entrepreneur, a pioneer and all around great guy,” Kevin Black, former President of WorldStarHipHop.com told AllHipHop.com.

The website was founded in 2005, with controversial fight videos, mixtapes, stripper videos and interviews with rappers. https://youtu.be/QHjTf15jQl0

BISHOP DEVILLE’S MODEL OF THE MONTH LIZ LOVA

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I am thoroughly passionate about spreading love, beauty and inspiration through the work that I do. Recently, I performed at a Rock It Out For Planet Earth event in San Fransisco and sang an original song that I wrote in honor of our planet.My experience as a host started in 2006 when I began hosting bellydance Haflas and talent showcases. I’ve hosted shows for Circus Tribal Bellydance, in Ashland Oregon, where I was the host and entertainment throwing in some humor as well as song. Another show I hosted in Ashland was a Talent Show benefiting the High School’s Choir on a trip to Carnegie Hall. I flew to St. Petersburg, FL and was the musical inspiration for a weekend retreat for women with cancer.I love the camera and I love being a part of projects that are for the greater good and can be an inspiration. I just love art. Alternative, unique expression is something I truly admire and love being a part of. I’m loving to meet people who are passionate about photography, music, dance and theater, and hope to collaborate in a creative, fun way!ImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

https://www.facebook.com/liz.lova

E-40 THE REVIEWS AND NEWS ALBUM RELEASES ,WINE DEBUTS AND TOUR DATES

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E-40 is inventive and entertaining on “The Block Brochure: Welcome To The Soil Parts 4,5 & 6.” But the 45-song set often drags due to formulaic, forced songs.

Unquestionably one of the most prolific, quotable and influential artists to ever come out of the West Coast, E-40 is now officially 20 solo albums deep in the Hip Hop game with his latest outing in The Block Brochure: Welcome To the Soil Parts 4, 5, & 6. And while he’s arguably running neck and neck with Snoop Dogg as the West’s most longevity-laden artist, unlike Snoop, 40 Water hasn’t had to resort to gimmicks, reality television and mainstream media leanings to have a successful catalog that’s over two decades long. Instead, the Vallejo, California emcee has managed to stick to a solid blueprint of palpitating, Bay Area-styled production and his own unmatched vocabulary of slang.

One of the main talents that has set E-40 apart from many of his contemporaries for so long is his distinct ability to find a solid balance between the larger-than-life West Coast persona he’s conveyed on records since the late ‘80s and the everyday people realism that comes naturally to him. On Welcome To The Soil Part 4, that talent is most pronounced on “Got That Line,” which finds 40 combining his greatest asset in his breakneck speed delivery with a pulsating, mob music slice of production, spitting lines like, “Survival tactics, never hustlin’ backwards / Throw off methods why I wear these glasses / So I can look like a nerd, po-po roll right past us, savage ass nigga from the gravel…”  “Bendin Corners” contains some of his most intricate and witty slang on the entire project: “I go ape on a fake if that’s what he want, I’m not a chump / I’m from Vallejo, Cali-Harm-ya, I ain’t no punk / D-boy apparel, candy Camero / Sharp like a arrow, hood like Valero…”

“Bamboo” features a chunky stomp-and-clap backdrop that allows for 40 to get as wordy and raunchy as he pleases, managing to easily squeeze what seems like hundreds of extra syllables into just a few bars. “By Any Means” with Webbie and J. Stalin is one of the bleaker songs on the set in terms of subject matter, but it is strangely overlayed with a somewhat celebratory, danceable beat, containing brief robotic sound effects. It’s proof that E-40 has one of the most inventive and unorthodox ears for production in Hip Hop history. The Chris Brown and T.I.-assisted “Episode” is reminiscent of Rick Ross’s “Diced Pineapples” in its raunchy forwardness, but actually a more entertaining song altogether. And though the Roger & Zapp-inspired “Money On My Mind” comes off as somewhat bland compared to some of the more inventive, risk-taking moments on Part 4, it still succeeds as an attempt at throwback nostalgia.

It’s clear from the majority of Part 4 that E-40 hasn’t lost a step in his 20-plus years of creating and releasing music. Throughout much of this project’s first installment, listeners will hear tons of thick, syrupy sound effects paired with pounding drums—all elements that have been part of 40’s signature sound for the last two decades and have heavily influenced generations of artists from all parts of the map.Image RELEASES